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There are 10 item(s) tagged with the keyword "Control Joints".

Displaying: 1 - 10 of 10

1. For Best Results, Plan Ahead for Concrete Joint Placement

Using control joints as design.Joints — both construction and control — are parts of almost every concrete project. Whether the job is a stained patio or a stamped sidewalk, good planning and a little extra care can help create a finished surface that’s both attractive and properly jointed.

By K. Schipper
2. Well-placed Joints in Concrete Help Channel Cracking

When it comes to concrete -- as with so many other things in life -- people tend to judge a book by its cover.When it comes to concrete — as with so many other things in life — people tend to judge a book by its cover. There’s nothing like a giant crack or a crumbling corner in a recent concrete placement to make an unhappy customer.

By K. Schipper
3. Durable Concrete Control Joints Fill The Need For Fast Turnaround

Applying the sealant with a hand roller while people look on.With quick return to service, ability to withstand years of foot, cart or forklift traffic, polyurea meets the requirements of many industries. From warehouses and retail showcases to grocery stores and more, polyurea is outperforming traditional epoxy, silicone, and polyurethane materials to fill and seal concrete slab control joints.

By Jasmine Stanley
4. Filling Control Joints in Decorative Concrete

Filling contraction joints, control joints - Control joints are cuts placed into the concrete at the time of pouring, or shortly after, to control random cracking in concrete. This works by creating a weakened area in the slab -- concrete cracks follow the path of least resistance.Control joints are cuts placed into the concrete at the time of pouring, or shortly after, to control random cracking in concrete. This works by creating a weakened area in the slab — concrete cracks follow the path of least resistance.

By Nick Dancer
5. Filling the Joint in Concrete

If semirigid joint fillers -- and knowing when to use them -- confuse the heck out of you then you are in good company.Not long ago my wife and I were having dinner at a well-known chain restaurant when we noticed that hundreds of feet of saw cuts had been left unfilled. I'm guessing this had to be a health issue. If nothing else, it made the floor look unfinished, to say the least.

By Doug Carlton
6. Recipes: Stamping & Texturing Concrete

It's well-known that one of the best selling points of decorative concrete is its ability to mimic other materials with incredibly fidelity while still delivering the versatility, affordability and durability of concrete. Stamped and textured concrete is an area of decorative work where that quality really shines.Three unique looks achieved by seasoned veterans with stamping and texturing tools - an authentic travertine tile look, a cobblestone finish and a patio with hand-tooled brick.

By Kelly O'Brien
7. Are You Waiting Too Long To Cut Your Control Joints in Fresh Concrete?

Pacific Palette saw-cut joint tool made these lines perfect on this concrete slabDecorative concrete contractor Tom Ralston has probably never met you, but even so, he suspects you’re waiting too long before cutting your control joints. “Saw-cutting concrete is usually done long after the concrete has been poured or has set up,” he says. “It’s kind of like locking the gate after the horse has left.”

Editors
8. The Importance of Control Joint Fillers in Concrete

Smoothing out the bead of joint filler on this concrete floor with a scraper.The choice of filler and sealant product for a decorative slab is influenced by the amount of movement taking place, the kind of abuse the surface will be taking, and, of course, how the filler will look.

By Loretta Hall
9. Where to Place Joints in Curved Concrete

Just because a slab requires control joints doesn't mean the joints have to be straight. Here's how to bend them to your will.Just because a slab requires control joints doesn't mean the joints have to be straight. Here's how to bend them to your will.

By Jack Innis
10. Joints: Control Your Concrete Cracks

After determining how far apart you should place the concrete control joints, how deep should you cut them? Well, that all depends on whom you ask.Tips for mastering the art of joint placement in a concrete slab.

By Stacey Enesey Klemenc

Displaying: 1 - 10 of 10

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