Main Menu

Search Results

There are 29 item(s) tagged with the keyword "Design Theory".

Displaying: 1 - 10 of 29

1. When Hand Brushing Borders on Concrete, Don't Stop at Intersections

3-D tile design by Rick Lobdell.Many of us are tackling more intricate designs, such as 3-D tile patterns with multiple borders. With patterns like that, there’s no concrete (pardon the pun) stopping point for hand brushing. Expansion joints help create stopping points but outside of that how can we brush large designs without the glaring brush marks?

By Rick Lobdell
2. Hand Brush Details on Concrete Borders

Rick Lobdell applies acid stain with chip brushOver the last couple of years, I’ve written articles on how I use math to break down design layout and my views of color theory. This time, I’m going to share one of the little details that help my projects look amazing — how to properly use a brush.

By Rick Lobdell
3. How to Use Sponges to Color Concrete

Applying an overlay to concrete with a rollerI’m not a fan of overlays unless they’re necessary, I continually compete against knockdown finish companies that prefer them. Most of my competition uses overlays on pool decks and patios no matter what. This gives me a unique spin to compete against them.

By Rick Lobdell
4. Designing a Basic Tile Pattern on Concrete

Rick Lobdell puts design into the concrete overlay.Now that summer is here I’m in full design mode on multiple projects that mostly involve basic tile patterns. Since I’m back in major math mode, I thought I’d share a challenging design project I did a couple of years ago for a client in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

By Rick Lobdell
5. Gray Scheme Dominant Choice for Decorative Concrete

Gray seems to be dominating current color schemes for everything. As I'm not a fan, I hope this trend ends soon. Forcing me to work in gray almost makes me turn down jobs. But work is better than being idle so if gray is your prospect's preferred hue, here are a couple of important points to think about when talking to clients. Gray seems to be dominating current color schemes for everything. As I’m not a fan, I hope this trend ends soon. Forcing me to work in gray almost makes me turn down jobs. But work is better than being idle so if gray is your prospect’s preferred hue, here are a couple of important points to think about when talking to clients.

By Rick Lobdell
6. Colors Come in Warm and Cool Hues

Black is not just black. When used full strength, it's a warm black. When diluted, it becomes a cooler brown. Think about that for a second.Talking to a client about color choices can be difficult. Many times, clients say they want brown, which is about the vaguest statement a client can make. In the last article, we focused on asking if they wanted it to be light or dark. This time we want to know if they want a warm or a cool brown. Warm and cool attributes are very much like lights and darks.

By Rick Lobdell
7. The Value of Color is Important to Concrete Design

The Value of Color is Important to Concrete DesignSo far, I’ve written a lot about math and my love for it as it is truly my favorite part of my decorative concrete work process. Recently, however, I’ve been getting requests to turn my attention to color, which I think would be a nice change of pace. Let me warn you in advance: If you thought talking math with me was complex, wait until you hear my take on color theory. I can go on for days.

By Rick Lobdell
8. Designing Scrolling Art for a Sprawling Concrete Patio

Scrolling Through a PatioFor the first time in this series, I’m basing my article on a current job I just finished. In the last one, I introduced scrollwork as a design element. I was still focused on symmetry and using scrollwork as a larger medallion in a room.

By Rick Lobdell
9. How to Create a Scroll Design on Concrete

Scrolls embellish elaborate designs in concreteThe theory of using the coordinates to plot points can be used anywhere in the room. It doesn’t only have to be about medallions. This is where I ask you to question what a medallion is to you.

By Rick Lobdell
10. How to Use the Cartesian Coordinates to Plot Points for Designs

Medallions Part 3: Courting the Cartesian CoordinatesOne of the most influential theories of math is called the Cartesian coordinates. The adjective, Cartesian, refers to the French mathematician and philosopher René Descartes who published this idea in 1637. Cartesian coordinates are the foundation of analytic geometry.

By Rick Lobdell

Displaying: 1 - 10 of 29

  Advertisements











Top