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Dirty Job's Mike Rowe on a Decorative Concrete Job Site for a Day

Discovery Channel’s Dirty Jobs and Richard Smith - When Discovery Channel's Dirty Jobs show called Richard Smith Custom Concrete about sending host Mike Rowe out to a decorative concrete job site for a day, Rick Smith rubbed his hands with glee, thinking to himself, "We're gonna get this guy filthy!"

When Discovery Channel's Dirty Jobs show called Richard Smith Custom Concrete about sending host Mike Rowe out to a decorative concrete job site for a day, Rick Smith rubbed his hands with glee, thinking to himself, "We're gonna get this guy filthy!"

And so they did. Rowe worked alongside Smith's crew for an entire day in 106-degree heat, pumping 136 yards of concrete, broadcasting release agent, troweling, cutting joints, stamping and more. Yes indeed, Rowe got dirty. But he and the production crew also got the team spirit, Smith says. "They understood why we do what we do — how we can get filthy and still have a really good time!"

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