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10 Favorite Concrete Decor Magazine Covers

From day one, we put a lot of thought into the covers for each issue of Concrete Decor magazine. Because it isn’t available on newsstands, we don’t have to try to appeal to the average grocery shopper standing in line, but we definitely want our cover images to be attention-grabbing. Out of the past 99 issues, we like to think that all 99 had amazing covers, but we did manage to pick our 10 favorites. How many of these do you remember or still have?
 

Concrete Decor magazine cover from May/June 2007 Photo courtesy of Artistic Concrete Surfaces
Photo courtesy of Artistic Concrete Surfaces

Top choice: Vol. 12 No. 4 – May/June 2012
This award-winning residential project in Overland Park, Kansas, features 600 fiber-optic lights embedded in stamped concrete. The work is by Artistic Concrete Surfaces in Olathe, Kansas.

Concrete Decor magazine cover from November 2007 Photo courtesy of J & M Lifestyles
Photo courtesy of J&M Lifestyles

Vol. 7 No. 7 – Nov. 2007
J&M Lifestyles LLC designed this bar top for an outdoor pool area in Old Westbury, New York. Embedded fiber-optic strands create a translucent effect in the concrete.

Concrete Decor magazine cover from September / October 2008 Photo courtesy of greenscenelandscape.com
Photo courtesy of greenscenelandscape.com

Vol. 8 No. 6 –Sept./Oct. 2008
Scott Cohen of The Green Scene in Los Angeles designed this project for a backyard pool remodel. Water cascades from copper wire spillways over custom glass mosaic tiles. The sheer cascades and spillways are backlit with fiber optics.

Concrete Decor magazine cover from February 2008
Photo courtesy of Arro Design

Vol. 8 No. 1 – Feb. 2008
Concrete is taken to new heights in this elevated two-story treehouse in Warren, Vermont.

Concrete Decor magazine cover from December 2008
Photo by Matthew J. Visser

Vol. 8 No. 8 – Dec. 2008/Jan. 2009
A fireplace in a Modesto, California, home is just one of many decorative concrete showpieces installed at the residence. Flying Turtle Cast Concrete made the piece.

Concrete Decor magazine cover from November/December 2009
Photo courtesy of Colorado Hardscapes

Vol. 9 No. 7 – Nov./Dec. 2009 Denver-based Colorado Hardscapes created this old-world fountain with materials that included ArcusStone and GFRC. The fountain was placed at The Streets in SouthGlenn, a retail development in south Denver.

Concrete Decor magazine cover from March/April 2009
Photo courtesy of Tom Ralston Concrete

Vol. 9 No. 2 – March/April 2009
“Where the Tree is Born,” by Tom Ralston Concrete of Santa Cruz, California, graces the J. Ellington Library in San Jose, California. To create this tree, Ralston and his team laid a thin rubber sheet on top of concrete and cut out a tree branch pattern. He sandblasted the area then acid stained the sand-blasted branches.

Concrete Decor magazine cover from August / September 2010
Photo courtesy of Brandon Gore

Vol. 10 No. 6 – Aug./Sept. 2010
Brandon Gore’s “Fern Table” is located in the Arizona studio showroom of Gore Design Co. The table was cast with GFRC, given a tea-wash finish, and features inlay details that include steel and a meteorite slice. The plant shown is alive, as the table was designed with a growing container suspended just below the concrete tabletop.

Concrete Decor magazine cover from January 2011
Cover design by Bill Simpson

Vol. 11 No. 1 – Jan. 2011
Concrete Decor’s 10th anniversary issue.

Concrete Decor magazine cover from February / March 2012
Photo courtesy of Roger Turk, Northlight Photography

Vol. 12 No. 2 – Feb./Mar. 2012
Absolute Concrete Works LLC of Poulsbo, Washington, created 1,500 square feet of GFRC panels to simulate shelved books for the main lobby of a new building at the Amazon.com Inc. headquarters in Seattle, Washington.

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