Concrete Overlays & Toppings

Overlays and toppings typically range from 1/16- to 3/4- inch deep and are applied to structurally sound concrete slabs to improve aesthetics, protect surfaces and extend life in lieu of ripping out and replacing existing slabs. There are several types of overlays including spray applied, troweled on, self-leveling, stamped and microtoppings.

Consider an Overlayment’s Tensile and Flexural Strength

Compressive strength — the ability of a material to withstand being compressed or pushed together — is often used to determine mortar and concrete’s quality. This makes sense for floors and overlayments as the primary forces applied to them are downward, compressive loads from traffic, equipment or anything affected by the force of gravity.

Quartz Versus Limestone: Which sand is better in concrete overlays?

Concrete overlays’ strength comes from combining specific amounts of portland cement, sand, water and polymer. Sand type is an important component in decorative concrete and concrete overlays because overlays are typically applied thinner than standard concrete, yet still need to withstand the forces of foot and automobile traffic.

Today’s Concrete Overlays are Durable and Good Looking

A baker knows when there’s a disaster in the kitchen, sometimes a little bit of icing can go a long way toward redemption. Concrete contractors have a similar option with overlays and an unsightly slab: The overlaid section not only looks better but the chemistry behind today’s overlay offerings often creates a much more durable surface than what was already there.

Concrete That Looks Like Wood

New Iberia, Louisiana, located 130 miles from New Orleans, has an elevation of only 20 feet. Wood floors are fine, but in this area prone to flooding, concrete floors are even better. And Keefe Duhon of Concrete Revolution has developed a specialty of concrete floors that look like wood planks, and he’s become known for it across the country.

Concrete Contractor Installs Wall-to-Wall Penny Floor

After installing a stamped and colored concrete driveway in Minnesota, Concrete Science was approached by his client’s neighbor and complimented on a job well done. As luck would have it, during the conversation the man asked if Villella did epoxy work. He said yes and the talk turned to something the man had always wanted: a wall-to-wall penny floor.