Tag: Public Works

Concrete Art in Cuba

The language barrier was the least of the obstacles a team of two professors and a student from Southern Arkansas University had to overcome during a weeklong trip to Cuba last November for an art project with the University of Artemisa. The saga began with a lack of supplies and ended with the death of Fidel Castro the night before the Americans left.

Modern Mosaic Artwork Livens San Diego’s Landscape

“It was back-breaking work,” says the owner of Brailsford Public Art in San Diego about placing colored aggregate piece by piece into wet concrete on a job site. She was working with Shaw & Sons’ Lithocrete system which incorporates a means to create a scattered aggregate pattern on a concrete surface.

Annual Decorative Concrete Competition Lauds Projects Based on Skill and Creativity

Contractors, construction companies, architects and designers are eligible to submit, and projects are judged on skill of installation, creativity, artistic expression and integration with the overall design intent.

LithoMosaic: The Art and Science of Decorative Concrete

Robin Brailsford’s online resume lists her as “Artist, Inventor, Aesthetic Engineer.” The word “concrete” doesn’t makes its first appearance until the third page, but nonetheless, Brailsford has made a huge contribution to the art and science of decorative concrete through her patented invention, LithoMosaic.

Decorative Concrete Trends in Colorado and Beyond

Some of the concrete design trends in Colorado differ from those in other parts of the country. In Colorado, we see a strong push for higher quality in even the most standard concrete. Even though we specialize in decorative concrete, some of our larger contracts this year include a good portion of standard uncolored broom-finished concrete.

A Colorful Transformation of a Transit Stop Using LithoMosaic Designs

“The imagery was kind of inspired by the playfulness of the site,” Lucking says. “It’s like psychedelic cactuses, which is what Fourth Avenue is like.” They decided Lucking would execute the design in a mosaic on the pavement, and Goldlust would render it as cutouts in the station’s steel benches and partitions.