Vol. 19 No. 6 – August/September 2019

Publisher Letter – August/September 2019

A few years back, L.M. Scofield celebrated its 100th anniversary. Next January, Sundek will celebrate 50 years, and Concrete Decor is about to hit its 20-year mark. While there are numerous other companies worth noting, these benchmarks convey success within our decorative concrete industry.

ICF Safe Rooms Offer Shelter From Natural Disasters

Tornadoes are extremely dangerous natural disasters that can come with little to no warning. People who live in tornado-prone areas, as well as those in hurricane locales, should have a safe place to go when bad weather hits. In the worst-case scenario, not having a proper safe place to retreat to can become a death sentence for homeowners and/or their families. 

Polished Concrete Helps Deliver the ‘Neighborhood Goods’

Williams and Witherspoon brought their brands — the Serena leisure apparel line and Draper James, Wither­spoon’s Southern-flavored women’s clothing label — to Neighborhood Goods in the Dallas suburb of Plano, Texas. The store is billed as a “new kind of shopping experience, with brands that will rotate in and out,” the Dallas Morning News reported.

Surface Prep: Eliminating Chances for Concrete Failure

For thousands of years the permanence of concrete has made it an ideal construction and design medium for architects, engineers and builders. Even the word “concrete” is often used as an adjective to describe the reality, longevity and durability of everything from objects to ideas.

Today’s Concrete Overlays are Durable and Good Looking

A baker knows when there’s a disaster in the kitchen, sometimes a little bit of icing can go a long way toward redemption. Concrete contractors have a similar option with overlays and an unsightly slab: The overlaid section not only looks better but the chemistry behind today’s overlay offerings often creates a much more durable surface than what was already there.

Going Beyond Square-edged Countertops

Although rocker Huey Lewis made headlines singing how it was “Hip to be Square,” artisan Ben Ashby couldn’t quite jibe with that mantra when it came to concrete countertops. Back in the early ’90s, others in the fledgling decorative concrete business — like FuTung Cheng and Buddy Rhodes, he remembers — were perfectly fine with square-edged countertops but Ashby wanted more for his creations.